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Products and accessories to turn your house into a smart home.

one: Roomba vacuum, by iRobot. Get clean floors without even pushing the vacuum. The Roomba collects dirt and debris from the floor, including under and around furniture and along wall edges.

two: iGrill cooking thermometer, by iDevices. Check the temperature of your meal without getting up from your chair. iGrill monitors food temperature from up to 200 feet away and will alert you when your food is ready.

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Lining the storefront on Euclid Avenue in the Central West End are samples portraying flowers, females and other traditional images through the colorful stained glass work. Look above and you’ll find Tiffany-style lamps hanging all around. You can also observe craftsman in the midst of making the stained glass right in the store.

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Scott Mosher, Director of Sales at The SOHO Shop, shares how to get wired.

SLHL: What does a homeowner need to start the process of a home automation system?
Scott:
Our systems are designed around a single interface that is the same across any device.  So, we can simply start with a smartphone (from Apple or Android) or a flat panel to provide the basis for a home automation system.  A high-speed Internet connection also helps with features like streaming music and remote access.

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You’ll find a lot of France and a little bit of Disney at Vin de Set. The French influence is on the plate. The Disney is in the attitude, a can-do approach to whatever diners request.

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A love fest. That is the way the owners describe the building of their nine-year-old Des Peres home. Even nearly a decade later, as they gather with the builder and architect to reminisce, compliment after compliment is passed around the table. Rarely is such chemistry between a home-building team, comprised of builder Roger Johnson, architect Bill Cover and New Mexico-based interior designer Barbara Ellena, as strong as the union that built and designed this contemporary classic. “When we all got together, it just clicked,” the homeowner says.”

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In the past eight years, Carol has taken the small, 50-by-70-foot space and filled it with 12 small specimen trees, flowering vines, lush shrubs, perennials and annuals, all set out in curvaceous, boxwood-edged beds that line three sides of the landscape.

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